Theology 101

The culture of non-commitment

The Extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family, held in October 2014, and the upcoming Ordinary Synod on the Family in October 2015, have made reflection on the vocation and mission of the family, both in the Church and in the modern world, very timely. Over the next year, therefore, Theology 101 will explore the Church’s teaching on many of the themes being considered by the two synods.

Single-parent families

The Extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family in October 2014 and the Ordinary Synod on the Family in October 2015 have made reflection on the vocation and mission of the family, both in the Church and in the modern world, very timely. So during 2015, Theology 101 will explore the Church’s teaching on many of the themes that are being considered by the two synods.

Mixed and inter-religious marriages

The Extraordinary Synod of Bishops on the Family, held in October 2014, and the upcoming Ordinary Synod on the Family in October 2015 have made reflection on the vocation and mission of the family, both in the Church and in the modern world, very timely. Over the next year, therefore, Theology 101 will explore the Church’s teaching on many of the themes being considered by the two synods.

The Tenth Commandment: You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods

The “tenth word” of the Decalogue brings a close to the Ten Commandments by summarizing “all the precepts of the Law.” It unfolds and completes the Ninth Commandment, which warns us against the danger of lust. It contains the Seventh and Fifth Commandments because coveting the goods of another can lead to theft or violence. It also touches on the first three commandments because avarice is rooted in idolatry. 

The Tenth Gift: You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods

The Seventh Commandment: You shall not steal

The “seventh word” of the Decalogue primarily reveals to us that God wants us to act justly and with charity in our relationships with one another. In this way, we are able to live in communion with God, who is just and loving. Specifically, the Seventh Commandment “commands justice and charity in the care of earthly goods and the fruits of men’s labor.” It forbids the unjust taking or keeping of goods belonging to one’s neighbor and the wronging of another as it regards his or her goods.  

The Fourth Commandment: Honor Your Father and Mother

In the first three commandments, we receive the gifts of God’s self-revelation to humanity. We also learn what constitutes a proper response to this self-revelation and, thereby, a proper relationship to God. As we move forward in our reflections on the commandments, we will see that the final seven are gifts that primarily reveal God’s will for us in our relationships with each other.

The fourth gift: Honor your father and mother.

The Third Commandment: Remember the Sabbath Day, to Keep it Holy

I have set before you life and death, the blessing and the curse. Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live, by loving the Lord, your God, heeding his voice, and holding fast to him.”(Dt 30: 19-20)

The gift of the Ten Commandments “is the gift of God himself and his holy will.” Specifically, the “10 words” are the words of God that “point out the conditions of a life freed from the slavery of sin.” They show us a path of life that sums up and proclaims God’s law and will “make explicit the response of love that man is called to give to his God.”

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