Work Life

Can I find true happiness in my career?

Q: How do I find true happiness in my career? I'm unhappy in my job.

A: A happy occupation is a worthy preoccupation. We’re wired for happiness. And let’s face it – work makes up the lion’s share of our waking hours. No wonder the writer of Ecclesiastes cites enjoyment in one’s toil as one of life’s greatest blessings. (2:24)

First, love God. Ground your happiness in Jesus Christ. If you direct your affections toward his infinite lovability, you’ll possess a happiness that is foundational, delightful and unshakeable.

Do I have a loyalty problem if I'm always job-hopping?

How can I balance wanting to continually change jobs to advance my career with appearing to be disloyal and permanently dissatisfied?

If you can’t be with the job you the job you’re with.*

You might be posing a false dilemma. The desire to advance career and achieve your potential is good. That normally requires moving up, taking on new challenges, and new jobs.

How can I negotiate more time off for the holidays?

How do I negotiate more time off for the holidays to be with my family? What words do I use?

Please? Pretty please? With sugar on top? I’m beggin ya! The words are secondary. What counts is your reasoning.

Since everyone wants more time off at the holidays, first consider why you should be given special consideration. What makes you or your circumstance deserving of preferential treatment?

I don’t have the tools and materials I need to get my work done

I don’t have the tools I need to get my work done. Nor can I meet my deadlines. My computer is extremely slow, and I don’t get the materials I need in a timely fashion to produce results.

Tools and time. Reminds me of tool-time and the old sitcom Home Improvement. These are two simple problems. I presume you’ve posed them to the main problem-solver – your boss? Here are three possible responses to you telling your boss exactly what you’ve written above:

How do I manage my classmates as their supervisor?

I am a senior in high school, and I’ve just been promoted to supervisor at my job at a store in the mall. How do I manage people who are in my classes at school without making them hate me?

Address the issue in a frank and upfront manner. Let them know that you’re aware that it’s kind of an awkward dynamic. You’ve been given some authority, but you’re not going to lord it over anybody. You’re co-workers first. And your goal as supervisor is to help them enjoy their work and enjoy success. You want to be a servant leader.

How do I juggle the demands of two bosses?

I’m an administrative assistant for two attorneys who are both partners in a law firm. I’m often in a position where they’ve given me too much to do and the work needs to be prioritized. Neither one sees his work as being “second.” How do I juggle their demands?

Sue them?

You’ve got three problems: overload, ambiguity and two “me first” bosses. Three solutions are communication, coordination and clarity.

I'm overwhelmed with personal invitations from employees

I run a small company and I’m often getting invited to employees’ parties for their kids’ events, like graduations, weddings and first Communions. I hate to offend them, but if I go to everything, my spring and summer weekends would never be my own. Can I pick and choose, or is it all or nothing?


Render to employees that which is employees’ and to weekends that which is weekends.

Do I have to hire my boss' nephew?

My supervisor wants me to hire his nephew for the summer. We have other, more-qualified applicants – this doesn’t feel right. Is there a way I can say no? Should I go over my boss’ head?

Don’t go over his head. Get into his head. Diplomatically ask him three questions. If he gives perfect answers, it will go like this:

Question 1: Authority

You: Boss, I need your direction on this hiring decision. Is it my responsibility to hire for this job?

Boss: Of course. You have the authority.


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