Your Life

There are shortcuts in cooking, but not in faith

On the weekends my kids usually request waffles for breakfast. Not the easy ones you throw into a toaster, but the ones made in a real waffle iron that you have to stand over… for several minutes at a time… and then painstakingly clean afterwards. Don’t get me wrong, as much as I enjoy cooking and baking, I sometimes opt for the shortcut toaster variety, so I can use my weekend to work on other projects.

But recently, my perspective on taking shortcuts in certain areas of my domestic life has changed a little.

Do I have a loyalty problem if I'm always job-hopping?

How can I balance wanting to continually change jobs to advance my career with appearing to be disloyal and permanently dissatisfied?

If you can’t be with the job you the job you’re with.*

You might be posing a false dilemma. The desire to advance career and achieve your potential is good. That normally requires moving up, taking on new challenges, and new jobs.

She says: Joe is always telling our friends what to do

Joe is always telling our friends what to do, and he doesn’t realize they’re rolling their eyes as soon as he starts imparting his “words of wisdom.” I just want one party where he listens and doesn’t talk – is that too much to ask?

He says: Why shouldn't I share the fruits of my research?

What can I say – I read a lot. Why shouldn’t I share the fruits of my research? I’m sure Marybeth is exaggerating – our friends love me!

Alternative Spring Break? Can I mix fun with something meaningful?

Feeling a tug to do something more meaningful on your spring break than relax on a beach? Here are a few things to consider:

1. What is my purpose? Not your purpose in life – but the purpose behind your spring break plans. Are you looking to leave your life behind and R-E-L-A-X? Are you finding a way to glorify God in your plans? You can absolutely glorify God in relaxation – though the path to questionable decisions often begins with idle time.

She says: I think we should sacrifice to have no debt

Daniel thinks a growing balance on our credit card is fine, but I don’t think we should keep spending and paying these high interest charges. We need to live within our means.

He says: I think we can 
carry a balance on the credit card and live well

I don’t see the problem with paying a monthly fee on our credit card bill so we can buy the things we want and live comfortably. Christine is too frugal.


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