Work Life

I don't have any friends at work

I’ve been at my job for a few months now, and I haven’t made any friends yet. I feel like no one cares about me as a person. How can I make connections with people and turn my co-workers into friends?I

It’s good that you want to feel connected to people at work. But, at the same time, be realistic about the nature of work and the nature of friendship.

Work is a place where we get things done, where we join our talents and efforts with other people to accomplish things — to produce goods or services. And we get paid to do so.

How can I avoid forced overtime?

I am regularly working more than 50 hours per week, even though I’m only supposed to be working 40. I don’t really care about the extra money – I’d rather have the time. Is there a way for me to avoid this forced overtime without losing my job?

Well, it’s nice to be wanted. And overtime is much better than undertime or no time at all.

I’m stuck in a dead-end job

There are four levels of satisfaction you can mindfully appreciate, in ascending order of fulfillment:

1. Stuff - Appreciate that your work generates money. Money has its rewards — like food, clothing and shelter.

2. Self - If you do your work well, take pleasure in your accomplishments, no matter how modest they seem.

3. Others - To the degree that you interact with colleagues or customers, make every effort to love and serve them.

My coworker won’t share crucial information

Apply the four cardinal virtues. You might remember them from the catechism (1805-09). They’re essential for human excellence and, from top to bottom, also give us a roadmap for problem solving.

Prudence. This is the perfected ability of right decision making. It’s the charioteer of the other three virtues, and it’s all about being rational – getting the best result through the best means. Get clear on your goal. Your bottom line result is good coverage during your coworker’s absences. To get there you’ll need:

How can I make the most of my internship?

Be determined. If you are willing, my son, you will be taught, and if you apply yourself you will become clever. If you love to listen you will gain knowledge, and if you incline your ear you will become wise. (Sir 6:32-33)

Since your boss is busy, ask what you can do to lighten his/her load. Don’t be a pest, but be pleasantly persistent. Be observant and look for opportunities. Seek advice and perspectives from experienced co-workers. “Pursue wisdom like a hunter, and lie in wait on her paths.” (Sir 14:22)

Do I have to get all my retail staff together for meetings?

There is a phrase called “death by meetings,” but there’s also a kind of “death by no meetings.” The biggest challenge in every organization is communication. The best companies do it well.For starters, I recommend a 30-minute weekly meeting, same time and place. Focus on the operations and tactics, with a look-back at last week, and look-forward to the next.1. Get clear in your own mind. What are the top three things you and they need to know? What are the success indicators? What’s bugging you? What’s bugging them? At a minimum, meetings should solve problems.

Should I blow the whistle on safety violations?

My workplace has several machines where safety guards have been removed, plus a few other things I am pretty sure are OSHA violations. My boss told me to just ignore them and do my work, but I’m afraid someone is going to get hurt. I’m also afraid I’ll be fired if I blow the whistle. What do I do?

For starters, I’m assuming from your question that your company doesn’t have a stated policy or protocols for dealing with safety matters, or recourse to an ombudsman or human resources department.

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