Your Faith

A Roadmap for Our Life in Christ The Beatitudes, part II

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus gave us a roadmap for being his faithful followers. How do we best navigate this roadmap? Here are some guidelines:

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

Hunger and thirst are powerful states. They indicate a need that demands to be satisfied. They are incessant, calling out for our attention continuously and in ever greater intensity through discomfort and pain. Ultimately, the price for failing to satisfy our hunger and thirst is death.

A roadmap for our life in Christ – The Beatitudes

As we now move into the “Third Pillar” of the Catechism, we will learn that the new dignity we discover in Christ calls us to lead a new life that is “worthy of the Gospel of Christ.”

This new life is the life of communion with God, or beatitude. Because this is the end for which humanity was created, this pillar of the Catechism explores both beatitude and the ways of reaching it.

I hear there is a new Anglican rite, along with married priests. How does this work?

Dear Father Joe: I hear there is a new Anglican rite, along with married priests. How does this work?

You’ve got it right: there is a new Anglican rite in our Church that brings some married priests into our mix. How this happens is a testament to our belief in the power and beauty of truth – and it’s great stuff.

Be Moved St. Bavo

Feast day: October 1

In an instant, everything can change; a life can be forever transformed. Of course, the kind of change envisioned here is the movement that issues forth from the Spirit following an encounter with the truth, who is a person, Jesus Christ.

Consider the story of St. Bavo (also known as Allowin or Bavon). Born near Liège, Belgium, to a Frankish noble family in 622, young St. Bavo earned a reputation for being wild and selfish. His lack of respect for the dignity of others was epic. He even sold his servants to other nobles as slaves.

Am I really supposed to be an evangelist?

Dear Fr. Joe: I hear talk that we are supposed to evangelize, but I’m not sure I want to do that. What does it mean?

I think it must be a tough thing to hear so many people talking about evangelization without telling us exactly what it is. For a lot of people, the idea of evangelization conjures up images of people yelling from street corners, condemning others or trying to get people to think just like we do. If that is our image of evangelization, then no wonder it has no appeal to us!

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